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Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     859971
Type:     Roman Imperial
Issuer:     Lucilla
Date Ruled:     AD 164-183
Metal:     Silver
Denomination:     Denarius
Struck / Cast:     struck
Date Struck:     AD 164-169
Diameter:     18 mm
Weight:     3.58 g
Die Axis:     6 h
Obverse Legend:     LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Obverse Description:     Draped bust right
Reverse Legend:     IVNO_NI_LVCINAE
Reverse Description:     Juno, veiled standing left, raising her right hand and holding an infant in left
Mint:     Rome
Primary Reference:     RIC III 0771 (M. Aurelius)
Reference2:     RSC II 38
Reference3:     Szaivert 008-4a
Photograph Credit:     Classical Numismatic Group
Source:     http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=155563
Grade:     Good VF, toned
Notes:     Originally the goddess of childbirth, Lucina later became an epithet for Juno as “the one who brings children into the light.” The line, “Juno Lucina, fer opem, serva me, obsecro,” (Juno Lucina, help me and give me strength, I beg of you) written by the Roman playwright Terence in Andria, exemplifies the custom for expectant mothers to address their prayers unto her.