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Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     80000771
Type:     Roman Imperial
Issuer:     Constantine I (The Great)
Date Ruled:     AD 306-337
Metal:     Gold
Denomination:     Nine Siliquae or 1 1/2 Scripulum
Struck / Cast:     struck
Date Struck:     AD 322-323
Weight:     1.57 g
Die Axis:     6 h
Obverse Legend:     CONSTANTINVS P F AVG
Obverse Description:     Laureate and cuirassed bust right
Reverse Legend:     GAVDIVM ROMANORVM FRANCIA
Reverse Description:     Francia seated left on ground, head low, and wearing pointed cap, and resting on right hand; to right above a trophy; below, a bow with arrow.
Exergue:     FRANCIA
Mint:     Trier
Primary Reference:     RIC VII 365
Reference2:     Depeyrot 28/7
Reference3:     Vagi 3109
Photograph Credit:     Classical Numismatic Group
Source:     http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=132994
Grade:     EF, lustrous, a couple tiny contact marks
Notes:     Sale: Triton XII, Lot: 771 Extremely rare, only the 4th known example. According to the panegyrist Nazarius (Pan. Lat. 4, delivered in AD 321), Constantine’s son and heir, Crispus, aged 13 or 15 at the time, successfully undertook a campaign in AD 320 against the Franks and the Alemanni. Crispus’ victory signaled the vitality of the Constantinian house and a renewal of Roman military action against the western barbarians following the conclusion of the Civil War with Maxentius. No doubt multiples such as this coin were presented to officers who had assisted in the campaign. Such a major victory was fortuitous, since that same year, Licinius, Constantine’s chief rival, broke the treaty the treaty established three years earlier. The end of this renewal of civil war would finally see Constantine as the sole master of the Roman Empire. For Crispus, however, his succession to the throne would be unfulfilled. In AD 326 he was implicated in a plot against the emperor and killed.